This House Of Clay And Water by Faiqa Mansab: A tale of forbidden love, freedom and the need to belong.

A story of two women and a transgender.

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All throughout my journey of reading this novel, the only thought that kept coming back, constantly hovering around was the inability to write a review that would do justice to the masterpiece that is This House of Clay and Water. How would I ever put into words what Mansab did so elegantly? And then I realized, it didn’t matter. It didn’t matter because a book like this one, needed to be read, to be preserved and referred to. What the author has portrayed through the book has so far only been scoffed at, or spoken in hushed tones. Her promising debut novel is a fresh voice to Pakistani Literature and is sure to create ripples for times to come. It’s not a story you forget easily. It keeps coming back, to stay with you. It’s a novel you often think about. It’s a story that becomes a part of you.

This House Of Clay and Water is a story of love, of freedom, of identity, of betrayal, of courage and the need to belong somewhere. It’s a story of three lost souls, who are trying to find meaning, who are trying to fit in, to have a purpose. It’s a story of two women and a eunuch. It’s about Nida, Sasha and Bhanggi whose paths are meant to cross each other. Nida, an intelligent woman, married to Saqib who belongs to an affluent political family, tries to comply to the standards society has set. Nida, is also our protagonist. Burdened by the patriarchal system and belonging to the elite class, she struggles constantly. Her imagination, her ideas, her feelings have been reduced to nothing. Her life is supposed to revolve around her marriage, her husband, whose idea of an ideal wife means being submissive to him and functioning according to his convenience. After all, that’s what a woman is for. Nida is broken. She says, “I’d morphed, altered, nipped and tucked away bits of my personality for so long, I no longer recognized myself. I feared that one day, even if I wanted to, I wouldn’t be able to identify myself. I’d be forever trapped in an image of another’s making, and there would be no escape because I would have forgotten to want to escape” Sasha, on the other hand, belonging to a middle class family, married with two children, dreams of a luxurious life and an escape. Both the characters seem to be caught in a web of their own insecurities, hurt and shattered dreams. The third character, Bhanggi, a eunuch, belongs to the most neglected marginalised minority group in Pakistan. All his life, he’s been considered worst than pests, called a stain to humanity and beaten black and blue by everyone he comes across. He says, “I cannot rid myself of the affliction called hope. I scoop up its broken shards within the cups of my hands. I hold it fast to my heart every time it shatters against the monolithic reality that looms at every, in every human eye.” For Mansab, to attempt to portray a hijra as a normal person with natural feelings, is a brave effort. No other writer could have done it so beautifully.

The three characters; Nida, Sasha and Bhanggi meet at a Dargah. Here starts a bond of friendship and of love. The characters evolve and undergo drastic changes throughout the novel which makes it even more compelling. The plot is smart. The author’s narrative technique and form played an important role in transforming the story. Mansab transitions between first person narration and a free style. The reader will automatically adjust to the change because it’s not abrupt but rather smooth.

The novel is based in Lahore and the author has aptly described the social structure of the society; Where hypocrisy, money and power dictate how lives should be led. A society that still continues to uphold the patriarchal nature; who deems a woman to be less than man.

Any woman who had been with more than one man, even if it was within the bounds of holy matrimony, was considered a slut. Islam failed to impress men here. Though the religion they expunded upon every waking hour permitted a woman to remarry in case of death of the husband or divorce, she was deemed promiscouus if she took advantage of said law.

In the novel, Mansab, portrays the regressive nature of the people, of breaking stereotypes and how women continue to be exploited in the name of religion. It’s as much a story of redemption, of lost love as it is about outdated societal norms and disillusionment. This House Of Clay and Water is a powerful and moving novel, one that has dived deep into the psyche of humans and has opened up room for sensitive issues which are only discussed in closed rooms.

Some words are prisons. They’re labels of reduction. They’re like stones catapulting through mouths, hundreds and thousands of mouths, to target and hurt.


Author: Faiqa Mansab

Publisher: Penguin Random House

Pages: 272

Format: Harcover

Rating: 4.8/5

 

Reading Update.

A quick wrap up on what I’ve read and what I plan to read.

I AM BACK.

I have been avoiding writing blog posts and at first I was genuinly busy but then I didn’t feel like writing. I mean, I don’t even have a legit excuse for being below average at blogging and I have no remorse. But heyyyy, I am here now so let’s catch up?

My reading has been like Kolkata’s weather. Warm & sunny followed by incessant rain, thunder & lightning. It has ranged from reading 8 books in a month to barely managing one book. I was also the lucky recipient to uninvited reading slumps which as you might have figured hampered my reading. Since I’ve missed out on posting monthly wrap-ups, I’m going to briefly tell you what I’ve read and what I am currently reading.

May:

  • Clear Light of Day by Anita Desai: I loved this book. It was part of my MA syllabus and I was so glad I got to read it.
  • Baaz by Anuja Chauhan: You can read my review to know what I think about this one. Review: BAAZ

June: 

July:

  • Glitter and Gloss by Vibha Batra: Glitter and Gloss by Vibha Batra
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Fin by Mark Twain
  • The Scarlett Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
  • The Ice Twins by S.K.Tremayne

August: 

  • A House Without Windows by Nadia Hashmi: Easily one of my favourite books of the year.
  • The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid
  • What Kitty Did by Trisha Bora: What Kitty Did by Trisha Bora
  • A Torch Against The Night by Sabaa Tahir
  • Three Psychos by Yash Pawaskar

 

I am currently reading Mr.Mercedes by Stephen King which is my first novel by the author. I understand I am late to the King bandwagon but it’s better late than never, right? I will write a review once I am done reading it. I am hoping to start with IT by King since the movie releases this friday and I want to read the book and prepare myself before watching the movie. It’s unlikely that I’ll watch the movie in theatres since the book is a 1000 pages long! I don’t even remember the last time I read such a thick book. It’s going to be a task, a difficult one. Other than that, I have no set TBR pile since I never follow it. I have a problem with sticking to rules even if I set them myself. I do, however, like challenges which brings me to my Goodreads challenge. It gives me great pleasure to announce I’ve read 34 out of 50 books so far with 4 months still left. I think I am pretty much on track and I MIGHT finish reading all 50 books before the year ends but let’s not get too ambitious.  I also got done with MA exams and I’m awaiting results. It feels oddly weird not having to worry about exams or anything yet feels so incomplete. Being a student sucks but it also has its own charm.

That’s all from my side. Here’s to hoping you hear from me soon.

Also, what are you currently reading?

Three Psychos by Yash Pawaskar

Three Psychos narrates three different stories from three different point of views. Each bizzare and unique.

When I read the blurb for this particular book, the stories seemed bizzare and completely out of the box. Three Psychos seemed too complicated and I wondered if the author would be able to engage its readers. A few pages in and I was quite impressed.

Three Psychos by Yash Pawaskar narrates three chilling stories, each unique and twisted on its own. The human mind has the habit of playing scenarios that are often a series of illusions. The protagonists in each story are living in their own bubble, often away from reality. Psychology is the study of human behaviour but how can one study such extreme behaviours? Is there one methodology or technique? That’s where we hit a dead end. Because believe it or not, humans are unpredictable and a tad bit crazy. And in the case of Three Psychos, completely crazy. I felt a series of emotions ranging from utter hate for the protagonists to empathy to denial.

The narrative technique of the writer is commendable as he was able to blend fantasy, psychological thriller and romance under one umbrella. Such qualities in a story is difficult and challenging. The writing style is easy flowing with the author giving philosophical and profound insights about life and death. Here’s one such quote:

Death teaches a lot about life. I don’t understand why people are afraid of death. It is just another part of life, albeit the last part of life as far as we know. It is just like any other phase of life: you are born, you grow up, go to school, go to college, get a job, get married, have kids and..die. We are scared when we approach all these stages, and overcome the fear when someone who has faced it tells us that it is all right, that they have experienced it too and that you can sail through it.

However, no one has shared their after-death experience. Thus, the fear of unknown is what scares people. Who knows? Maybe it is not that bad, maybe it’s all sunshine and rainbows.

A naked man stuck in a white box, a hospitalized patient who talks to aliens and is apparently on a mission and a teenage boy who is on a killing spree make up for the three psychos in Yash Pawaskar’s novel. You will be hooked right from the beginning and will only stop when you have all the answers. If psychological thriller is your genre, then Three Psychos would be a great pick.

You can buy the book from here: Amazon


Author: Yash Pawaskar

Publisher: Dimple Publication

Rating: 3.8/5

Format: Paperback

Pages: 157

Genre: Psychological Thriller

Blurb:

Three Thrilling Stories, One Gripping Novel. In the first tale, a naked man is trapped inside a white box. His only company: ‘DE22912’. How long can he survive? The second story, ‘Patient Number 9’, is about a hospitalized patient who must save Earth from an alien attack by blue pig-like creatures. The countdown has just begun. In the third narrative, an angry sixteen-year-old gets hold of a loaded revolver and is determined to make use of all ‘Six Bullets’. And no, it’s not a toy. The three psychos are part of a connected universe, set in a novel with innovative storytelling, witty narration and an entertaining mix of thrill, humour and drama.

March Wrap up and Haul

A month of books, assignments and haul!

April is upon us.

I have a love/hate relationship with time. Sometimes I seem to float with the passing of time and on other days, I feel like I’m stuck in a labyrinth and everything is on pause. Well, that’s life. Now let’s get to business, shall we?

March was a busy month. If you’ve been reading my blog posts, you’d be aware of the humongous assignments I had to complete. Good news is I am done with all my assignments. I spent almost all my time writing each day and crying because ASSIGNMENTS ARE HARD. My reading was slow. And by slow I mean really really slow.  I read 3 books. Am I ashamed? No.

  • UNNS: The Captivation: I’ve written a detailed review. You can find it here: Review:

 

  • No Time for Goodbye: LOVED IT. You can read the review here: Review

 

  • Chameleon lights: I can’t talk about this book as of now except that the review will be coming up shortly along with some exciting news. Stay tuned.

 

If my reading was slow then my book buying habit was on an all time high. Shall we take a look?

  • The lovely folks at Writersmelon sent me a number of gift vouchers as part of their reviewing programme which I made use of by ordering several books. In my defense, they’re all part of my syllabus (not all of them). You see I think passing my MA exams would be a cool thing, no?
  1. Untouchable by Mulk Raj Anand
  2. Clear Light of Day by Anita Desai
  3. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  4. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  5. Intentional Smiles by Shazia Omar and Merrill Khan ( This was sent to me by Bloomsbury India).

I am looking forward to April. It should be a good reading and writing month!

What did you guys read in March?

Review: UNNS: The Captivation

A secret Mission. A childhood love affair. Death and Revenge.

Author: Sapan Saxena

Publisher: Inspire India Publishers

Pages: 244

Genre: Thriller/Romance

Rating: 3.5/5

Blurb:

“Of course you know about the seven stages of love, but have you ever lived them?”

Atharva Rathod and Meher Qasim.

Lovebirds since adolescence. Bonded by love, separated by circumstances. They part ways only to meet again. But this time, he is on a secret mission…

Are they in control of their own destiny, or its their destiny which is making them dance to its tunes? Only time would answer, as Atharva and Meher unwillingly and unknowingly transcend the seven stages of love.

A quintessential tale of love and romance marked beautifully by its own rustic old school charm.

 

My Review:

Caught in the midst of childhood love and innocence, Meher and Atharva, fight against all odds to defend what’s right to them. Atharva is a RAW agent, one of the best the indian government has ever seen. Meher, on the other hand, is working against the indian government who were responsible for the death of her father. Their paths cross but are they meant to be?

UNNS: The Captivation is a story about childhood lovers who take separate paths but destiny binds them together under circumstances that changes their life forever. Atharva, is on a mission and meets Meher after 15 years. Little does he know that the love of his life will eventually lead to his doom. The story keeps getting complicated as Atharva tries to decipher what’s happening to him. Suffering from a rare disorder, Atharva, despite his pain, keeps his eye on the mission till Meher arrives and ruins everything for him. Just when he could trust her, Meher, siding with the anti-national forces cons Atharva leading to his arrest on the charges of treason against RAW and India. A failed secret mission that lead to the compromisation of several other RAW agents. All this because Atharva was blinded by his childhood love. His credibility as one of the best RAW agents is on the line and there’s nothing he can do but surrender. His only regret: Why would Meher take advantage of his love for her?

The story does not end there. Infact, it keeps getting complicated. They meet again. Under different circumstances. But will Atharva’s love fool him once again? Or will he see right through Meher? That’s for you to read and discover.

The writing style is pretty simple. Sapan Saxena didn’t lose grip of the plot and was able to create suspense without making the reader pull their hair out. Although, there were a few errors as far as writing was concerned but since the story is indeed captivating one can skim through easily. I think novels that are a blend of romance and thrill go a long way in receiving readers’ attention and bringing parsie to the author. I really enjoyed the climax because it wasn’t cliche at all and did justice to all the characters.

If you’re into novels that have a bit of romance but at the same time are filled with suspense and thrill, then UNNS: The Captivation would be a good choice.

 

Exam Tips: Last minute study hacks.

Last minute tips and tricks to ace exams.

It’s that time of the year again.

Last year I wrote a blog post on acing examinations which was not very specific but aimed solely on how to study. Today I am going to attempt to write and explain to you some of the last-minute exam tips and hacks I’ve learnt over the years and I’m still learning. Since most of you will be appearing for your University and Board examinations, I thought I’d help you ease off a little. And as I always say, do not let these marks define who you are.

  • LEARNING: Most of you might be at the revision stage right now (kudos to you, I have no idea how that feels) but I’m sure or I hope some of you still have to learn the subject material. So how do you do that when you’ve got revision to do?
  1.  You start by picking one topic a day and scheduling it with other topics you have to revise. Don’t learn every thing on the same day. If you’re short on time and studying one topic a day wont cut it then use what I call, “Divide and Conquer”. This means that you study a new topic in the morning and take up another new topic sometime in the evening/night. You revise your subject material in between the ‘learning’. This avoids cramming. Your brain needs time to process new information so be kind and revise instead of continuously hammering your brain to function.
  2. Before you start a chapter, go through the previous years question papers and see if the chapter is worth spending time on. Since time is paramount, you can’t waste it on a chapter that’s only going to amount to 2-3 marks. Don’t come at me, nerds, I know even 1 mark is extremely essential. But you’d rather lose 10 marks than 1, right? Prioritise what’s important. You’ll realize that you’ll be feeling less stressed and are able to study more. If you find some extra-time, go ahead and tackle the 2 mark chapter.
  3. DO NOT STUDY THE ENTIRE CHAPTER. When I gave my boards, I was of the opinion that I HAD to study everything. Every chapter has certain topics that are more important and always have a chance of being in the question paper. Focus more on them.  If you’re certain about a particular question, practice writing down the answers. You’ll be surpised how much time you save in the exam hall. Which brings me to my next point:
  4. Practice writing. I have always advocated using a pen and a paper while studying. Really, it works wonders. Keep making sub-points while you’re studying. Seeing answers written on paper have a higher chance of staying in your mind. I don’t know how it works but recalling answers become 10 times easier. Be creative, use diagrams, flowcharts, acronyms, anything that will help you retain information. You might feel you’re wasting time writing down answers but then when you sit down to revise, it’ll take you less time.(If you followed my advice of writing answers, you’ll already have a set of notes prepared. SEE WHAT I DID THERE? HA!
  5. Something I discovered this year was studying using Youtube. I gave my first year MA exams and was OBVIOUSLY behind schedule. Since I was required to read a lot of plays and novels and all that cool stuff, I realized watching videos on certain dramas helped. For instance, I read and watched, Dr.Faustus. I was not very sure of the context of the play and watching Youtube videos helped. Visual learners are in for a treat with this. I’m sure there are several videos on various subjects out there. Check out Salman Khan Academy, CrashCourses if you’re short on time and can’t find a quick fix.
  • ORGANIZE: I am still understanding what organization stands for. But I’ll try to break it down.
  1.     To-do-list: Make a list of the things you have to study for the day as soon as you wake up. This helps a lot. You kind of get an idea of where you stand and what you need to do. Also, ticking off things from the to-do-list is the single most best feeling in the world. Take it one day at a time. You have to try to stick to the list you’ve made if you want to avoid wasting time. BUT and there’s a big but, do not make a list that’s ambitious. I know you want to make the most of your day but always keep sometime for relaxation. Being well prepared is not directly proportional to 16 hours of studying. Even if you study for 4 hours with breaks in between, you’re doing fine.
  2. Test yourself. I think the best way to find out what you’ve learnt is to attempt question papers right after you finish a chapter. This works pretty well for me. You can dig up previous years’ question papers and see if you’ve understood the material. Again, this might not be the case for you. Maybe you’re better off answering questions after a revision. Great, do that.
  3. Study with a friend. I remember studying with my best friend for my 10th boards and during under-grad and we used to update each other on what we studied. Not only does it give you the encouragement you need, it also makes studying fun. And if you’re someone who is competitive, you’ll make sure you study way more than your friend does.
  4. Take regular breaks. Since you’re studying a few days before the exam, it might not be possible to take breaks often. What you can do is study for 2 hours and take a break for ten mins. No matter what you do, your brain needs time to process. Jumping on to different topics won’t help. I’d rather spend 10 mins watching cupcake videos then cram. (At least, I’ll learn something). I don’t think I need to say this but keep yourself hydrated at all times. Keep snacks and drinks at your disposal to avoid wasting time.
  5. If you’ve been trying really hard to study and are not able to focus at all, leave it for the time being. Just go for a walk or listen to music and come back to it. Forcing yourself is never going to work. If you find yourself still struggling, move on to the next chapter or a different subject. Tackle it again the next day or after a day or two. Sometimes you have to take a detour to find yourself home. *mic drop*
  • FOCUS ON YOUR WEAKNESS:  We all have THAT one subject that makes our insides curl and gives us nightmares. For me it was maths. I HATED IT. I no longer have to study numbers( Thank heavens for that) but I still get jittery when I think about it. Try to devote each day on such a topic. I know it’s hard but that’s the only way you’ll be able to score well. If it’s maths for you, then practice maths more than you would normally do. If it’s history or geography, study half a chapter or a full chapter everyday. The idea is to stay in touch with the subject so that it doesn’t feel overwhelming a day before the exam. If you score very well in all other subjects but don’t score well in one subject, your total goes down drastically. That’s exactly what we’re trying to avoid.
  • STOP COMPARING:  I cannot stress how important it is to realize who you are and what your battles are. Your dreams are different from your friends. You’re not the same. Don’t get bogged down by what your friend is accomplishing or plans on doing. It’s easy to feel lost but losing yourself in the process sucks more. Just do your thing.

Please remember, these exams don’t carve out a future plan for you. Sure, it helps you get into a good college et cetera but they’re not everything. Don’t burden yourself with what others expect of you. Focus on what you want the most and never compromise on your mental state over something as trivial as exams. I say this from experience. Most of the things you’re worrying about won’t even matter in the future. Give your 100%. That’s all.

The above tips are very subjective. One formula does not work for everyone. I hope It was of some use to you. Do you have a study hack I could use? Let me know!

 

January Wrap Up

A month in books, blog posts and author meet ups!

Don’t you think the month of January stretched for far too long? Despite that, my reading was poor. I have no excuse except that I procrastinated heavily to a point where I was procrastinating procrastination. I could manage to read 3 books. However, I did write 6 blog posts which is black magic IMHO. I hope I continue being consistent here. Let’s see what January was like:

  • Selfienomics by Revant: A pretty promising debut novel on life, politics, emotions and health. I liked how the author opened room for discussion, citing important facts that we otherwise ignore and giving us a bollywood-ish feel. If you’re looking for a light, self-help book, Selfienomics would be a smart pick. You can read the review here: Review: Selfienomics

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  • Lanka’s Princess by Kavita Kane: A retelling of one of histories most epic tale, Ramayana. I absolutely loved this book. I wrote a detailed review which you can read here: Review: Lanka’s Princess. I also had the honour of interviewing Kavita Kane. The interview is here: Author Interview: Kavita Kane

 

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  • The Curious Incident of The Dog in The Night Time by Mark Haddon: I LOVED THIS BOOK. It’s one of those books that’s rewarding, a story that’s going to stay with you for years to come. Mark Haddon’s portrayal of a boy with Asperger Syndrome and his disassociated mind is so well captured. It’s funny, wise and griping right from the start. The author gave us an insight into an autistic mind where emotions are absent and the world is based on number and logic. I have to write a review for this one. (Remember what I said about procrastination?)

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I attended the Kolkata Literary Meet 2017 and met Shazia Omar and displayed sheer awkwardness and lack of emotion. (WHY AM I LIKE THIS). The author, however, was really warm and welcoming. Her book Dark Diamond was the topic of discussion at the Lit meet. You can read the review here if you’re interested in reading historical fiction: Review: Dark Diamond

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Took this picture at the Western Quadrangle of Victoria Memorial. 

Can we talk about what I plan to do in the month of February( I SPELT FEBRUARY WRONG 5 TIMES, MAYBE I SHOULD LEARN SPELLINGS FOR A START)?

  • Reading at least 6 books including a classic because I plan on passing my  exams, so yeah. I also have to study and work on assignments. I have no idea how that’s going to happen.
  • Writing reviews. I suck at this.
  • I have been meaning to do blog posts on studying, writing cover letters, applying for jobs etc. Although I talk about books here, I want to diversify a little. Let’s see how that goes.

Well, those are a few things I plan on doing in feb.

What did you do this month and what are you planning for the next month? Let me know!

Get Interview Ready!

Cracking interviews is hard but preparing in advance is half the battle won.

Disclaimer: I am not an expert. I am still learning how to adult. Whatever I say in this blog post is just a sum total of my experiences while giving interviews. Call it a case study. (You can call it whatever you want).

Congratulations! You finally got the interview call you’ve been waiting for or in other terms losing your sleep over. You’re excited and nervous. While it’s not rocket science that you should prepare yourself before an interview, it is also essential to keep certain little things in mind before your big day. Following aren’t tips but just a few reminders that in my opinion set you apart from other candidates. (You see I spend a lot of time observing people because a.) I’m easily bored. b.) I get good material to write on):

  • Appearance: From what I’ve seen, there are two kinds of people. Those who dress for a red carpet event and those who look like homeless drug addicts. It’s not wrong to dress either way but since we’re trying to make a statement by not drawing unnecessary attention, we should stick to basics. The idea is to look professional. (Put on those nerd glasses for special effect). You might wear something that’s in vogue but if you end up looking like you slept in those clothes, it’s not going to work. First impression is HIGHLY important. Choose subtle, warm tones and if you cannot wear heels do not wear them. You wouldn’t want to trip right in front of the interviewer. (I’ve seen this happening and it wasn’t a good sight). Unless, you’re interviewing for a fashion magazine or something in that field, you’re allowed to be creative.
  • Being on time: I’ve already mentioned the importance of giving a good first impression and punctuality is one of the prerequisites to that. For once in your life, start early. The advantages of reaching early are plenty:  a.) Since there are a number of external factors involved such as weather, traffic, your car breaking down, your uber driver being an idiot etc you have to play it safe. Now is not the time to take risks. So in case something goes haywire, you can still make it on time.  b.) You get time to compose yourself. Go through your notes. Look around. Soak in the vibes. Do breathing exercises. Whatever it is that helps you calm your nerves. c.) You can interrogate the person before you who came out of the interview. It’s enlightening to say the least. You get a gist of what’s about to hit you and you get time to mentally prepare yourself. I think it’s one of my favourite things to do. (Also, when you’re waiting for your turn and it kind of gets dry, you can start clicking selfies. #Adulting  #IHaveNoIdeaWhatImDoing #SoNervous).
  • Organise yourself: We’re all a mess. Well, I am. I never have anything sorted. It’s not humanly possible to have everything in control but there are a few things we can take control of. The company you’ll be interviewing at will give you instructions about the documents you should be carrying. Here, make sure you have everything organised in a file in a chronological order. Get photo-copies of all your documents and certificates just in case they need to keep it. What happens is when you’re inside the interview room and you’re being grilled, you can’t spend time thinking which certificate is where. Not only do you look clumsy searching for the document that should be in your file, you come across as being unprepared. If you know where your documents are, you can easily present it when asked. ( I once dropped the entire file inside the interview room and well the rest is history).
  • Don’t talk too much: No, really. Just answer their questions as articulately as you can. If they ask for an explanation, you can drop that thesis you’ve prepared. There’s a difference between being confident and being cocky. It’s okay to brag here and there as long as you can support your statement. For instance, you might be asked to describe yourself (I loathe this question), don’t say you love food and you can eat 10 chicken nuggets in a minute. No one cares. What you can say is you love food and you love trying out different cuisines and you would like to be a food blogger someday. Avoid giving vague answers you can’t account for. DO NOT say you’re a voracious reader if you’ve only read Twilight or 50 shades of Grey .While I was giving interview for The Telegraph You internship programme, I mentioned being an avid reader and my dream of wanting to author a book someday. I got asked a lot of questions about the types of books I read, the genres I liked and if I wrote a book what would the title and genre be. Employers are smart. They can look right through you and won’t hesitate in calling you out. They are looking for people who can contribute to their organisation and prove to be an asset. Keep this in mind.
  • Prepare some basic questions: 1.) Describe Yourself. 2.) Where do you see yourself in 5 years? (Reading a book and crying over the death of a fictional character) 3.) What are your hobbies? 4.) Why do you want to work in our company? (Because you’re hiring?) 5.) How can you contribute to our organisation? You get the drill.

Since I love embarrassing myself on public platforms, I’m going to tell you one of my interview stories. So this HR of a reputed company asked me, ‘Where do you see yourself in 5 years?’. My reply will make you cry,’Urm..I haven’t thought of it’. I never got a call from them after having cleared all the rounds. In my defence, it was my first ever interview and I wasn’t too keen on having a future. The question hit me like a ton of bricks and I didn’t know what to say. I mean, I don’t know what I’m going to do after I write this blog post, leave alone thinking in future tense. Alas, that’s life. We have to make scenarios in our heads of all the things that MIGHT happen. Jokes apart, I learnt my lesson the hard way and I’ve got no regrets. Things happen for a reason.You might not have a clear idea of where you’ll be after 5 years but just imagine how you see yourself. Employers love asking this question.

  • Stop trying to be different: Logically speaking, you’re not the first person the employer is interviewing and you won’t definitely be the last. Employers have seen it all. Trying to be someone you’re not is digging your grave. You should just have confidence in who you are and believe in giving the best. At the end of the day, you’ll know you got that job because of your competency and personality. And that, my friend, is the single most best feeling in the world.
  • Do your homework: Study about the company, their clients, their strategies. Another thing you can do is present to them an idea of what you would do had you been in their place in terms of marketing strategies or launching new products etc. This shows that you’re passionate about working in the said company and you’re willing to go the extra-mile without them asking you to. (I haven’t yet tried this but I will when I get the chance). Try this and let me know?

I love this quote from Jim Lehrer:

There’s only one interview technique that matters… Do your homework so you can listen to the answers and react to them and ask follow-ups. Do your homework, prepare.

  • Zero-Expectations: I hate to break it to you but try to be realistic. Don’t get me wrong, you should have huge expectations but only of yourself. You can’t vouch for anything else. Life is not a wish granting factory and somethings don’t go our way. You might have given your best and still you weren’t selected. Don’t lose heart, keep trying. There’s enough sun for everyone. You have something in you to have gotten this far and maybe better and bigger things are in store. This way when you do get the call, you’ll be happier.

There is no specific rule to cracking an interview. It depends on the employer and the interviewee. Subjectivity is a prominent factor dominating interviews. No two people will have the same experience giving interviews at the same company. It all boils down to what you have to offer. The above points are only for reference. Some may work for you, others might not.

If there’s something I really believe in, it is working hard to get what you want. Nothing in the world is out of your reach. You need to be willing to grab it, you need to be ready to sacrifice your sleep, you need to show up everyday. It won’t be easy but it’ll be worth it.

All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them“- Walt Disney

Review: Selfienomics

A seriously funny guide to living the good life.

Author: Revant

Publisher: Bloomsbury India

Genre: Self-help

Pages: 191

Format: Paperback

Rating: 4/5

 

What happens when you read a book that is bombarded with memes, hashtags, open dialogues, hard-hitting questions and a desire to perceive the world around you differently? You become enlightened. #Nirvana

One of my reading goals this year was to read self-help books because my life has a tendency to spiral around I decided to rely on people to do that for me. Well, jokes apart, it is a decision that I plan on implementing. I started this road to self-discovery with Selfienomics, a debut novel, by Revant which

a.) Is extremely funny. You know the kind of funny which makes you pause and laugh like a retarded seal?  No? Okay.

b.) Is informative and very well researched. Ofcourse, self-help books are supposed to be researched blah blah. It is well researched in the sense that it is relatable to everyone especially the current scenario of Indians and India.

c.) You get to make a choice. Revant didn’t shove his opinion down our throats instead he paved the way for open-end discussions where you are the sailor and you get to decide the direction. No judgement there.

Selfienomics talks about life in general. Food, Feminism, Politics, Religion and how to read the label off of a food item before buying. Reading the book made me realise that there are a lot of things i’m ignorant about or I consider it extremely trivial for an intellect like me to dwell upon. I was wrong. I think that’s what reading good books are like; you begin to develop the ‘why syndrome’. Why does something happen the way it does? Why are people so stupid? Why am I such an idiot? You get the drill. For a debut novel, Revant has managed to bring burning issues under one umbrella and has successfully tackled them in a delightful manner. I’m going to cite some of my favourite examples since listing all of them is not possible:

Since I have been in the process of job hunting and trying to make a career the idea of Personal Branding stuck to me.

There exists a chicken and egg problem today in relation to jobs and experience. You need a job to get experience, and you need experience to get a job. Don’t let lack of experience deter you from pursuing your interest. No one is born with experience. While experience may often be irrelevant and specific to an industry, your personal brand is relevant across all sectors. When your personal brand is of an individual who is honest and gives his or her best, opportunities are sure to open up. Focus on building your #PersonalBrand and experience will follow.

While we’re on the topic of doing something in life, I can’t help but mention the author’s advice on categorising our goals. Career goals, Moral goals, Bucket Lists, Financial Goals etc. Not only does it help us realise what we truly want but also helps in overcoming the identity crisis that is prevalent with the youth of today. By prioritising, we can be more productive and work towards our dreams.

If you aren’t able to fulfil your own dreams, make it your dream to fulfil the dreams of others.

Speaking of serious issues like Feminism, Patriotism, and birth control, the author tries to portray the harsh reality, the pros and cons of our current situation citing examples and showing where we as a nation stand.

It’s commendable how the author was able to merge concepts of economics and the business world with real life situations. All in all, Selfienomics delivers more than it promised and is a smart attempt at creating a world that is educated and accepting of each other’s differences.

Aim for an open discussion–which encourages criticism as well as allows mistakes.

 

7 things a reader goes through after finishing a book.

Even though the story has ended on a happy note, the reader is left with a sense of loss and sadness that can never be measured in words

Who said endings are always happy? Even though the story has ended on a happy note, the reader is left with a sense of loss and sadness that can never be measured in words. Feeling empty or hung-over after finishing a book is quite obvious to book lovers. It’s almost like losing a friend or a loved one or saying goodbye knowing you’ll never meet again. You are left in the dark, isolated, wanting for more. If you’ve read a book that’s stirred every little part of your body, mind and soul, then these are a few post-reading blues that you’ll be able to relate to:

  • Book-hangover: It’s like you’ve been drunk on that last story and even though you tried sleeping on it, you can’t seem to get over the heartache. There’s a strong need to keep reading the book even though you have completed the entire series. To re-read the series again or to read something quite similar? The struggle is real. No matter how hard you try you’re left with a void that can’t be filled. You’re stuck in the story and you can’t find your way out.

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  • The look:   We’re all familiar with being asked questions by non-readers that only make us cringe even more. It goes something like this: “So you finished reading the book in a day?”  Seriously, I can’t roll my eyes any further. Of course, I did. It is not rocket science.

 

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  • Inability to start afresh: They say you need closure to leave behind what can’t be and focus on what can be. As true as it might sound, it’s not the case with book lovers. You just can’t seem to let go because you’re so emotionally involved in the magical world of the last book.

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  • Empty head syndrome:  You have finished the book and you have no idea what you’re going to do with your life. You feel empty, your stomach churns but there’s nothing you can do except maybe get lost in another book.

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  • Obsessing over fictional characters: Do you ever have those days where you start comparing fictional characters to real life people? You’re so in love with the characters that you can’t help but bring them into life through your imagination. You’ve laughed at their idiosyncrasies, cried your heart out at their death and empathized with them at their endeavours. Curiosity takes the best of you as you want to know what happens to the characters after the book ends; do they live happily? Do they even survive? Do they continue being as fearless and brave till the end? The possibilities are incalculable. Hallucinating about a particular character is part and parcel of being a reader and if you’re lucky you might find your favourite fictional character in real life.

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  • Desire to meet the author in person:

It’s amazing how when you read a book, it makes you question about the world in general and you wished the author was a dear friend of yours so that you could meet him/her in person or call them up to let them know what their book meant to you or hound them into writing another sequel. Sigh, the world isn’t a wish granting factory after all.

 

  • Urging other people to read:

Nothing satisfies the soul better than discussing a book over a cup of coffee. Having someone describe or narrate their experiences of reading the same book as you and getting to know their version of how the book could have or should have ended is like a step towards recovery. You’re introduced to novel concepts, different perspectives and point of views that you might have missed.

ALSO, YOU’RE GOING TO SUFFER AS MUCH AS I DID.

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Some losses are irreplaceable and it’s only natural to feel this way. What matters is that you’ll live with the story and characters all your life and you can always go back to re-reading your favourite book and re-living everything you seemed to have lost.

 

Do you ever feel hollow from within after having read a book? Which book has made you feel this way and why?