Book Review: Option B

“Seeking joy after facing adversity is taking back what was stolen from you”

Advertisements

Author: Sheryl Sandberg

Publisher: Penguin Random House

Pages: 176

Format: Paperback

Rating: 4/5

I don’t know anyone who has been handed only roses. We all encounter hardships. Some we see coming; others take us by surprise. It can be as tragic as the sudden death of a child, as heartbreaking as a relationship that unravels, or as disappointing as a dream that goes unfulfilled. The question is: When these things happen, what do we do next?

Life, as we know it, is unpredictable. You’re walking down the road in your freshly cleaned and ironed white shirt only to have mud splashed across your entire body. You’re standing on the road, hailing abuses at the vehicle who did it, but there’s only so much you can do. Or maybe accidently dropping the scoop of icecream you’d been wanting to savour. These are small almost unimportant terrible things that happen. What does one do when they fail at an important phase of their life? How do you react when you lose a family member? Where do you go when you’re fighting to live?

You want to give up. Leave everything. And escape. But you don’t. You wake up every day, confused, miserable, but still ready to move on. When there’s no Option A, you kick the shit out of Option B. That’s exactly what this novel by Sheryl Sandberg is all about. To find the light at the end of the tunnel, to find the silver lining and learn to live some form of Option B.

The sudden death of Sheryl’s husband turned her world upside down. It came as a blow, one she thought she could never recover from. To make it worse, she couldn’t think of a life where her children would grow up without having a father. Happiness seemed like a distant dream. Sheryl feared her children would never find happiness again. They would never be normal. She would never be normal. Adam Grant, psychologist at Wharton and a dear friend of Sheryl jumped to the scene. Together they discovered how to cope with adversity and build resilience. Talking about Resilience Sheryl says:

I thought resilience was the capacity to endure pain, so I asked Adam how I could figure out how much I had. He explained that our amount of resilience isn’t fixed, so I should be asking instead how I could become resilient. Resilience is the strenght and speed of our response to adversity–we can build it. It isn’t about having a backbone. It’s about strengthening the muscles around our backbone.

So began a lifelong journey of Sheryl coping with the loss of her husband, maintaining her job as the COO of Facebook and ensuring her kids grew up to be strong and resilient. One of the foremost principle’s used in the book are the 3Ps that stunt recovery. This was formulated by psychologist Martin Seligman when he was studying how people deal with setbacks.

  • Personalization: The belief that we are at fault
  • Pervasiveness: The belief that an event will affect all areas of our life.
  • Permanence: The belief that the aftershocks of the event will last forever.

Studies have shown that the minute adults and children accept that they’re not in control of every situation, that they’re not to blame and that these hardships won’t follow them everywhere and will not affect all aspects of life, they recover quickly.

The book follows Sheryl’s everyday struggles which included attending her children’s school events alone or celebrating birthdays without her better half. One of the important points mentioned in the book which I personally found interesting was ‘focusing on worst-case scenarios’. Adam went on proposing that instead of trying to find the positives in an utterly miserable situation, one should think of how worse the current situation could be. I mean, come to think of it, you’re alive and reading this review right now( well, I hope you are). And the gift of life is probably the biggest gift ever. In Sheryl’s circusmtances, Adam reminded her that her husband, Dave, could have died while driving their children to school. His statement sent chills down her spine overwhelming her. She realized her children were still with her and that gratitude took over grief.

Option B is a sum total of not just Sheryl’s loss. It has tremendous stories of people from all walks of life who have defied all the odds, survived at the face of adversity and have overcome illness, job loss, sexual assault, natural disasters and the violence of war. Not only do these stories inspire they also teach us how to persevere in times of hardships. They reveal how strong human capacity is and that pain usually bows down when faced with people who refuse to beaten by their circumstances.

I learned that when life pulls you under, you can kick against the bottom, break the surface, and breathe again.

Failure can either make you or break you. It’s easy saying you learn from failures. It’s difficult being on the receiving end. Talking about failures, Sheryl says, “Not only do we learn more from failure than success, we learn more from bigger failures because we scrutinize them more closely”. Imagine if we’d stop walking when we were little because we kept falling every time?

The measure of who we are is how we react to something that doesn’t go our way. There are always things you can do better. It’s a game of mistakes

—-Greg Popovich

I spent most of my time underlining and making notes because Option B does offer deep insights and there’s so much to learn from the book. The writing style is simple, it’s not preachy and Sheryl has described her emotions in a raw and unfiltered way. You can feel the emotions deeply but at the same time there’s a sense of hope and faith that pain is temporary.

We all live some form of Option B. This book will help us all make the most of it.

Sometimes it takes going through something so awful to realize the beauty that is out there in this world.

REVIEW: LOOKING FOR ALASKA

 

images (6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: John Green

Pages: 221

Genre: Contemporary YA

Rating: 4.9/5

“Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia.You spend your whole life stuck in the labyrinth, thinking about how you’ll escape it one day, and how awesome it will be, and imagining that future keeps you going, but you never do it. You just use the future to escape the present.”

Miles Halter leaves his Florida home to attend a boarding school in Alabama only to find himself caught up in a web of emotional conflict, love, heartbreak, guilt, denial and the problems of being a teenager. Miles or better known as ,’Pudge’ by his friends is the protagonist in the story and like every young adult is ignorant and uncertain about things. He is introduced to Alaska a pretty, confused and absolutely mysterious girl by his friend Colonel who also happens to be his roommate. The story starts unfolding slowly and as the layers start peeling itself you’ll find a deep-rooted bond being formed between you and the characters.

Let me just say that John Green is a pretty darn good writer. I say this not only because I can’t get over The Fault In Our Stars but because he hasn’t tried to portray a rosy picture of a typical young love. Rather he’s been pretty bold about showing that teenage life is filled with naive decisions, heart breaks, lots of drinking(LOTS OF IT) and irrational thoughts and actions.

Talking about the plot, Green starts off in a mysterious note. It starts as ‘Before’ and halfway through the story another part begins as,’After’. The former talks about Pudge trying to fit in to the casual life at Culver Creek, his growing affection for Alaska and increasing interest in the subject Religion. A fascinating thing about this novel is the way John has merged religion with the daily human idiosyncrasies.  It is not boring or dull but thought-provoking and inspiring.

To be honest, I found Alaska Young to be very obnoxious and absolutely effed up in the head given her love for drinking, smoking and playing pranks. Not the kind of girl you’d write a novel about. There was a point when I thought she was suffering from a bipolar disorder cause she was like a happy bunny in one second and a cranky hermit in the other. But and there is a big BUT, the unpredictable behavior and the emotional burden that Alaska carries is something and the only thing that will make you like her. Green made sure she had a certain novelty in her that would attract the attention of the readers. I couldn’t relate to Alaska Young in any way but that’s just me.

‘How will I ever get out of this labyrinth!”

So what’s the labyrinth?’ I asked her…

That’s the mystery, isn’t it? Is the labyrinth living or dying? Which is he trying to escape- the world or the end of it?”

The novel does not have a sad ending cause the thing that would tear you apart would happen out of nowhere in the middle of the story. I DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO REACT CAUSE IT WAS SO SUDDEN AND CRUEL. Slowly but painfully, I got used to the fact that it was real and what I feared had already taken place. The story does not lose its essence and purity right till the end. John Green always leaves so much to ponder.

Pudge, on the other hand, loves to know and learn about the last words of eminent personalities. Like the words or sentences they spoke after which they went straight to hell/heaven. HOW COOL IS THAT.  He, Miles Halter, is in search of a GREAT PERHAPS. Something extra-ordinary, a huge break, a new outlook on life.

“Thomas Edison’s last words were ‘It’s very beautiful over there’. I don’t know where there is, but I believe it’s somewhere, and I hope it’s beautiful.” 

 

It is only when the,’AFTER’ starts that the story becomes excruciatingly painful as it showcases life when you lose something you love and how you try to cope up with the loss. My expectations after reading TFIOS sky rocketed and I knew I had to lower my expectations.. To my shrill amazement, I wasn’t disappointed. You won’t need tissues while you read this book or a shoulder to cry on but there’s just so much happening, so many feelings and emotions that you’d need a few days to get over the greatness that the book is.

I may die young, but at least I’ll die smart.” 

I guess praising John Green is a helpless attempt. It is like describing why your mother loves you so dearly.

You’re missing out on life, if you miss out on reading Looking For Alaska.

Let’s go, its time to leave

She heard a faint voice calling out to her somewhere from the backyard. She stood up, wiping away the tears that had now formed in her colossal eyes. She had always been an obedient child and listening to her mother was a chore she would never deny even if that meant killing her own desires. She looked back at the place where she had spent her entire childhood. A place which gave her memories that would stay with her throughout her life. She would miss this place. More than that she would miss what she used to be. Going away meant leaving a huge part of herself behind. She was 20 and was no longer the little girl with two pony tails holding her father’s hand whenever they went out for a morning walk. She missed her father. She missed how he used to wake her up in the morning. The world automatically felt like a safer place back then. Her fathers’ warm embrace, his reassuring smile. It made her cry. She cried. Voices being heard outside again. This time she looked back at the photo frames decorated on her study table.. Staring at her father’s picture she realized how much she was like him. How much of her father’s traits were woven into her. She remembered the last time she saw him on his death-bed. He asked her to hold his hands, to not cry, to be strong. She didn’t listen to him. It wasn’t easy. How could she just watch him die? Of all things that happened to her watching her father go through excruciating pain had killed her. Mentally, she couldn’t revert to being herself ever again. She had no friends to rely on. Being the introvert kind, girls found her weird, some even went on to say she was retarded. Well, maybe she was different.

She looked at the picture of herself and her father of a breathtaking trip. She was 15 at that time and considering her love for adventure her father had taken her for bungee jumping. How she had screamed her lungs out at the sight of it. She smiled a half-smile, reminiscing the beautiful day. Tears falling down. She kept the photo back, turned towards her cupboard. She took out a cardboard box which had her father’s possessions hidden. Her mother was heartbroken and depressed after her father died and rarely kept a track of their only daughter. She was there physically but in reality she had lost her mother that very same day her father had left them. She had silently taken all his belongings and never mentioned anything about this to anyone. In it were photographs of their vacations to various places, his unusually weird hat which used to be the center of all her jokes. His watch, given to him by her on his last birthday, a locket which had both of their picture and his gun. A gun used by him as protection. She held it up in her hands, staring at it with hope and a way to escape. She took a deep breath, bought the gun closer to her forehead, her breath increasing by every second, she thought about her father once again. How happy she would be sitting right next to him, teasing him about his hat.. This made her smile. She waited for a few minutes to pass by. She waited for someone or something to tell her that what she was doing was right. That there was nothing wrong in it. An image of her father calling out to her revolved around her head. She laughed. The gun still firm on her grips. She made up her mind. She had to pull the trigger. A little pain and then it would end once and for all. Her mother would get infuriated but that didn’t bother her much. She had gotten used to her cold wrath. She wondered what she’d tell her father when they meet, would he be happy? He would be, obviously. She knew he missed her too. Sweat forming in her hands, she once again bought the gun to her head. A loud bang on the door shook her up completely. She kept the gun down, got rid off the cardboard box, wore her sweater and dashed out of the room.

‘I’m sorry for being late, mum. I’m ready, let’s get out of here’ . This time she didn’t look back.