March Wrap up and Haul

A month of books, assignments and haul!

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April is upon us.

I have a love/hate relationship with time. Sometimes I seem to float with the passing of time and on other days, I feel like I’m stuck in a labyrinth and everything is on pause. Well, that’s life. Now let’s get to business, shall we?

March was a busy month. If you’ve been reading my blog posts, you’d be aware of the humongous assignments I had to complete. Good news is I am done with all my assignments. I spent almost all my time writing each day and crying because ASSIGNMENTS ARE HARD. My reading was slow. And by slow I mean really really slow. Β I read 3 books. Am I ashamed? No.

  • UNNS: The Captivation: I’ve written a detailed review. You can find it here:Β Review:

 

  • No Time for Goodbye: LOVED IT. You can read the review here: Review

 

  • Chameleon lights: I can’t talk about this book as of now except that the review will be coming up shortly along with some exciting news. Stay tuned.

 

If my reading was slow then my book buying habit was on an all time high. Shall we take a look?

  • The lovely folks at Writersmelon sent me a number of gift vouchers as part of their reviewing programme which I made use of by ordering several books. In my defense, they’re all part of my syllabus (not all of them). You see I think passing my MA exams would be a cool thing, no?
  1. Untouchable by Mulk Raj Anand
  2. Clear Light of Day by Anita Desai
  3. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  4. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  5. Intentional Smiles by Shazia Omar and Merrill Khan ( This was sent to me by Bloomsbury India).

I am looking forward to April. It should be a good reading and writing month!

What did you guys read in March?

Review: Lanka’s Princess

“Words once spoken could not be redeemed, they were like inflicted wounds, the imminent scars lingering long.”

Author: Kavita Kane

Publisher: Rupa Publications

Genre: Historical Fiction

Pages: 298

Format: Paperback

Rating: 3.8/5

Kavita Kane’s novel, Lanka’s Princess, narrated from the POV of Ravan’s infamous sister, Surpanakha is a retelling of one of histories most epic tales, Ramayana. It is a story of war, death, hatred and vengeance. There are several questions that come in one’s mind. Was Surpankha an evil, blood thirsty woman who led to the tragic death of her own brother or lack of acceptance and love transformed a once meek and shy girl into a living monster? The answer lies at your understanding of the novel. I think books such as this one, leave so much to the imagination. I guess that’s what the author meant to do. Show us the state of the misunderstood Suparnakha.

Surpanakha’s childhood has been dealt with extensively, what she was like being born into a family of rishis and asuras, the circumstances that led to her change, and her ongoing battle with her mother that ultimately instilled revenge and hate. When reading the book, I felt various emotions for Surpanakha. It’s not whether her actions justified the bloodshed and loss but what forced her to take such drastic steps. In retrospect, she suffered a lot. Right from being neglected by her parents and brothers in her childhood to always competing for her parents love. Constantly trying to prove her worth but failing each time. People who were close to her left her. Her father left her after Ravan captured Lanka. Her grandmother whom she had immense respect for was killed. She lost her husband. Her son was killed. Her face was maimed by Lakshman. Suparnakha lived a life of pain and loss.

The writing is beautiful. The book is well researched and the descriptions are vivid making the readers travel into the ancient times. Kavita Kane is no doubt a prolific writer weaving intense emotions throughout the book. Although at one point the story reached a dry state but it was soon replaced with fast actions and the story kept moving forward. I haven’t read Indian Mythology much but it was a different experience. The characterisation especially those of the female characters was pretty impressive. The author through her powerful words made suparnakha speak out against the injustices. It was empowering considering the status of women in those times.

“Words once spoken could not be redeemed, they were like inflicted wounds, the imminent scars lingering long. A curse could not be renegaded: not even the mightiest spell could allay the power of the uttered word.”

Most people aren’t what they seem. History has always been a subject to fabrication. You can no longer decide what is wrong or right. Everyone is a victim of circumstances and what they choose to do is a reflection of their surrounding. Indian Mythology has considered Suparnakha to be the untamed, rebellious sister but the reality is very different. Kavita Kane’s novel delves into the psyche of Suparnakha and various other characters.

If you’re looking into reading Indian mythologies, Lanka’s Princess is a good book to start with.

Which is your favourite Mythology?

 

 

I received a copy of Lanka’s Princess from Writersmelon in exchange for an honest and unbiased review”

 

 

Review: My Father is a Hero

My Father is a Hero is a story about a father who goes out of his way for his daughter’s happiness.

Author: Nishant Kaushik

Publisher: Srishti Publishers & Distributors

Format: Paperback

Pages: 198

Rating: 3.8/5

Sometimes you read a book that fills your heart with warmth and a love so strong that its effect lasts a very long time. The simplicity and innocence of a father-daughter bond has been beautifully captured by the author Nishant Kaushik in his novel.

My Father is a Hero is a story about a single father who despite his shortcomings ensures his daughter an easy and fulfilled life. His daughter, Nisha, a 10 year old girl is the apple of his eye and the only source of happiness in Vaibhav’s otherwise dark world. He instils invaluable life lessons in her daughter who excels in all her academic fields and aspires to be a musician someday. They’re happy in their own little world, far away from the harsh realities, finding joy in the littlest of things. But things start to change.Β  Nisha, who is a cheerful, bubbly 10 year old, suddenly starts getting into a shell. She stops communicating, loses her friends, acts very distant and displays poor academic performance. Not just this, she stops singing, too. So what really happened that transformed her? This behaviour upsets Vaibhav who tries his hardest to get to the root of it. The only concern is to bring back his daughter’s smile which seemed to have been lost. How and what led to the change is described subtly in the book.

The conversations between Vaibhav and Nisha were my favourite part of the story more so because I could relate to them on a deeper level. I think that’s what good books do, they take you along on a journey filled with emotions and leave you wanting for more.

Be it real life or reel life, every parent tries their hardest to give the best to their children. Vaibhav is no different. He goes out of his way to become a superhero in the eyes of his daughter and I must say he fares pretty well. His daughter’s opinion of him matters the most. Aren’t all dads just adorable?

I would have loved to know more about Vaibhav’s past and the circumstances in which he coped. The ending was predictable and I wouldn’t have wanted it any other way. Besides, who doesn’t like a mushy ,happy end to a father-daughter story? All in all, I enjoyed reading My Father is a Hero and would recommend it to anyone who wants to feel all warm and fuzzy on the inside.

 

I received a copy of My Father Is A HeroΒ from Writers Melon in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.